How and Why Wikipedia Works: An Interview with Angela Beesley, Elisabeth Bauer, and Kizu Naoko

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This article presents an interview with Angela Beesley, Elisabeth Bauer, and Kizu Naoko. All three are leading Wikipedia practitioners in the English, German, and Japanese Wikipedias and related projects. The interview focuses on how Wikipedia works and why these three practitioners believe it will keep working. The interview was conducted via email in preparation of WikiSym 2006, the 2006 International Symposium on Wikis, with the goal of furthering Wikipedia research. Interviewer was Dirk Riehle, the chair of WikiSym 2006. An online version of the article provides simplified access to URLs. [Continue reading the full article online.]


Dirk Riehle. "How and Why Wikipedia Works: An Interview with Angela Beesley, Elisabeth Bauer, and Kizu Naoko." In Proceedings of the 2006 International Symposium on Wikis (WikiSym '06). ACM Press, 2006. Page 3-8.

The paper is available as a PDF file as well as online. Please note that it was not peer-reviewed and should not be considered a part of the technical program.

The article was featured in a Harvard Business School case and is included in other corpora as well.

Creative Commons License  This work is made available under the Creative Commons BY-SA license.

Copyright (©) 2006 by the interviewer and the interviewees. All rights reserved.


Erratum: Change "Gatali-Dureuses" to "Deleuze and Guattari's".

The online version reflects this change, the PDF does not.

Copyright (©) 2007 Dirk Riehle. Some rights reserved. (Creative Commons License BY-NC-SA.) Original Web Location: http://www.riehle.org